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A really useful resource is from the Carmel Library. Another is **Goodreads**. Use them to browse for new book ideas, if you feel stuck. Select a book, read it, and make a page about it here on the Wiki.

I recently found a free podcast on Greek mythology here. What have you discovered?


It is amazing the number of free mythology podcasts available. For those of us in a hurry, there is the Myth Minute Podcast. This podcast includes episodes on Hercules, Saturn, Janus, Phoenix and Atlas.
http://sigmamediaproductions.com/archive/myth-minute-podcast/

There is also the Celtic Myth Podcast. This podcast shares stories that relate to the changing seasons, traditional stories and even a video about the life of a goddess.
http://celticmythpodshow.com/

The most amazing thing about all these podcasts is how important people still find these stories and legends. There are people who believe them to be true and find their religion in the old ways, but there are those who are just interested by them. Most people remember bits and pieces of mythology from school, yet some students take that information and never forget it, and continue to learn more long after they have left school.--Cate Mahaney


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythology --- I know Wikipedia isn't the most reliable source to use, but I think it could be a good place to start to understand the basics of mythology. I now can look up more specific information like the origin of myth (which I found here http://library.thinkquest.org/C005854/text/types.htm), historical significances (which I found here http://www.history.com/topics/greek-mythology) and specific interesting mythology stories (like these http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/myths/a/GreekMythology_4.htm).
- deLacy Kennedy



http://www.paleothea.com/ This site is is down to earth and and easy to understand. Looking for a someone/something specific? There's an A-Z list of everything on the site. There are also tabs at the top that make it easy to navigate between the different subjects: Goddesses, Nymphs, Mortals, Amazons, Monstresses, Men, and Humans. _Andi Matecki

http://ehis.ebscohost.com.dbsearch.fredonia.edu:2048/ehost/viewarticle?data=dGJyMPPp44rp2%2fdV0%2bnjisfk5Ie46bZMtquzTa%2bk63nn5Kx95t%2fxWLKlr02tqK5JsJayUrKpuEmxls5lpOrweezp33vy3%2b2G59q7Ra%2bsr0mwqa5QsK6khN%2fk5VXj5KR84LPfUeac8nnls79mpNfsVbGss0%2bxprJLpNztiuvX8lXu2uRe8%2bLqbOPu8gAA&hid=115 This is a EBSCOhost document: Gods and heroes of Medicine in Greek mythology. It discusses how the practice of medicine went from a "divine gift to practical art." Since it was believed that the gods were the ones who sent the diseases to the human world, the gods were the ones that could cure the illnesses. So how did the mortals figure out how to cure sickness? What I found interesting was that there's even reference to the centaur Chiron (Percy Jackson's mentor) in this document, too. (You might need to use your Fredonia ID and password to access this.) _Andi Matecki

http://www.ancientsymbolsonline.com/ At this site you can view a ton of mythological symbols and their representations for a variety of different cultures including Egyptian, Norse, Greek, and many more. _Andi Matecki

http://www.planetozkids.com/oban/legends.htm Even though this class is based on adolescents, I thought this website could be useful for kids. It has different animal myths and legends about why animals are the way they are (how a kangaroo got its tail... the monkey and the crocodile... etc.) _Andi Matecki

http://mythweb.com/ This is also a kid-friendly site that is very simplistic in the number of gods/heroes it covers. It mainly focuses on Homer's Iliad, Homer's Odyssey and the Library of Apollodorus. There are also links on this site for teachers and for class projects as well as other helpful mythology links. _Andi Matecki



For the auditory and visual learners, here are two YouTube videos that review twelve of the main Greek Gods and Goddesses. (The first video is the Gods, the second is the Goddesses) There are many more than just twelve Gods and Goddesses, but these videos are fairly short, and give a nice summary of the myths that go along with each of them. The two videos go over the different qualities that each mythological character represents. Also, in the background, they flash a lot of different art depicting each God/Goddess. - Sarah Stanton

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WP_NeirFIkM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMzNPEHNxcc



The following link discusses "What are myths?". The site references Jung and Campbell, and is very informative to laying the ground works of myths. It is about the psychology magic and cultural truths of myths.-Amanda Guenther
http://www.livingmyths.com/What.htm


The History Channel is always a great and reliable source to gather information from! The topics they cover are the tales and legends of some gods, like Zeus and Hades, but more interestingly, how religion played such an important role during the time of the ancient Greeks.
<http://www.history.com/topics/greek-mythology> -deLacy Kennedy


This is a great website that covers descriptions about all Greek gods and goddesses, but it also gives a perspective about what life was like back then for the Greeks! It talks about art and architecture, wars, geography, and culture and society. This site personally helped me a great deal, because I am not too familiar with that time period. After reading, I have a much better overall perspective of the people, beliefs, lifestyles, and also the impacts mythology had, and why. <http://www.ancientgreece.com/s/Main_Page/> -deLacy Kennedy


Since I know some of us are pursuing an education degree, here's a website that I love to use for reference on creating lessons: ReadWriteThink. More specifically, this unit looks interesting, as students use technology to tell the stories of Greek gods, heroes and creatures:Unit Plan. -Kelsey Polhemus


I am a huge fan of Norse mythology. These sites, which I used for my connection of Norse mythology to the recent release of Thor, was very helpful. For someone who wants a basic overview of the gods and goddesses in Asgard, this is a good place to start.
http://norse-mythology.com/
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/

There is an exhibit currently going on at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts devoted to Aphrodite. Thousands of years later, we still look to Aphrodite when it comes to matters of love. The exhibit features Greek artifacts, as well as depicting her Roman counterpart, Venus. It sounds very interesting. It is supposed to coincide with Valentine’s Day, but it also coincides with our course. For anyone who is interested: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/02/12/aphrodite-and-the-gods-of-love-museum-exhibit-gets-visitors-in-the-mood-for-valentine-s-day.html --Cate Mahaney



This is a great site for younger students in elementary school to begin studying about ancient Greece. It has a plethora of topics to read short excerpts of information about, such as sea and ships, the Olympic games, growing up in Greece, arts and theater, and gods and goddesses. This is an educational site, but has a few fun games like creating your own hero and going on a quest. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot too scrolling through everything!
<http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=697> -deLacy Kennedy


"Fabulous Fun with the Greek Myths"
<http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/instructor/greekmyths.htm>

This site is similar with tons of unique, and awesome teaching ideas covering so many topics! <http://greece.mrdonn.org/lessonplans.html> -deLacy Kennedy


PODCAST "LearnOutLoud.com is pleased to present the Classical Mythology podcast. With this series we will investigate the gods, heroes, and myths that formed bedrock of belief in the ancient Greek and Roman world." The voice is a bit dull, but they podcasts are not too long and they are full of information! There are sixteen different stories to listen too. <http://www.learnoutloud.com/Podcast-Directory/History/Ancient-and-Medieval-History/Classical-Mythology-Podcast/26112#plink> -deLacy Kennedy



http://moongadget.com/origins/myth.html Here is a website showing the breakdown of Joseph Campbell's hero journey as applied to Star Wars, and The Matrix. -Alyssa Velk


http://www.thewritersjourney.com/hero%27s_journey.htm Since I'm a writing minor I found this website showing the breakdown of the hero journey as applied to writing stories. This may be of help when creating our myths. - Alyssa Velk


I have enjoyed the music of HistoryTeachers on YouTube for quite some time. She is, as probably already assumed, a history teacher who takes popular songs and makes them about history. The first video is about the Trojan War, using Homer’s epic as her source. There are several gods and goddesses referenced. For those of us who haven’t read it yet, it could be a cliffnotes until we get around to reading it.


This one is for The Odyssey.


This is the myth of King Arthur. Definitely a follower of the hero quest.

--Cate Mahaney




http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/mff/myths_mymyth.htm <-- This site shows various information on myths and features resources for teachers, parents, children and more. There are some very interesting things about the steps in composing a myth, in case anyone needs a push in the right direction. There is even a myth brainstorming machine, if you are stuck!
-Amanda Guenther


http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/3427/preview/: As an education major PBS website has been a great resource for me. This site in particular discusses the myth of Jason and Golden Fleece and includes a very detailed lesson plan of how to bring mythology into a classroom setting. I think this is important because many times the journey of a mythological hero reflects adolescence development. --Katlyn Swanson



http://greece.mrdonn.org/myths.html: This is a great website not only for kids learning mythology and specifically Greek Mythology, but it also can be used for anyone who is new to this subject. The website is designed for everyone; there are links for students and kids to discover greek stories, greek mythology, and the history of Ancient Greece. For teachers it provides videos, powerpoints, and interactive games to use in the classroom, all focused by the topic of Greek Mythology. --Katlyn Swanson




This video discusses the creation of Greek Mythology which allows viewers to get the basic understanding of all Greek Mythological characters and their purposes as well as how they were created. For me this was different from the other videos that have been shared because it allowed me to get a full understanding of how all the characters were connected to one another. --Katlyn Swanson




This video is a great resource, especially for visual learners, because it gives brief descriptions of the 12 Gods and Goddesses, but includes a few pictures of each of the characters. This could also be used as an example of a student project for Greek Mythological Gods and Goddess because it looks like a powerpoint put to music and in addition a few photos; simple and easy to understand. --Katlyn Swanson






I found this great series of youtube videos when searching for modern day examples for aspects of the Monomyth. They have each part broken down into a seperate video and it shows clips from modern day sources that demonstrate each step of the Monomyth. This one is the first step: the "Call to Adventure." Here is the link to the users webpage that created all the videos of each step in the Monomyth: http://www.youtube.com/user/PungentAroma . - Alyssa Velk



I get confused pretty easily who all the Gods and Goddesses are so here is part of a table that is easy to refer back to in order to look up the main Gods and Goddesses. -deLacy Kennedy

GREEK NAME
ROMAN NAME
CHARACTERISTICS
SYMBOL(S)
Zeus (ZOOS)
Jupiter (JOO-pit-er)
King of the gods. He is sometimes angry at the behavior of gods and people, but he can also be a gentle and caring ruler. he is particularly fond of beautiful women, regardless of whether they are goddesses or mortals.
thunderbolt, shield, oak tree
Poseidon (poh-SIE-don)
Neptune (NEP-toon)
Zeus's brother, God of the ocean and the earthquakes. He is often distinguished in art by the fisherman's trident that he carries-a three pronged spear.
trident, horse, bull
Hera (HEE-ruh)
Juno (Joo-noh)
Zeus's wife. Queen of the gods, guardian of marriage. She is a great lady and diplomat. Though she is often jealous and nags her husband, she can also be a tender and loving wife.
peacock, cow
Athena (uh-THEEN-uh)
Minerva (min-ER-vuh)
Daughter of Zeus (born, it is said, from his brain, when he had a bad headache). She is the goddess of wisdom and war, patriotism, and good citizenship. She is the protector and namesake of the city of Athens.
owl, shield, olive tree
Apollo [uh-PAW-loh]
Apollo
Son of Zeus. God of poetry, music, medicine and light. He is associated with the sun.
crow, dolphin, laurel, lyre
Artemis [AR-tim-is]
Diana [die-AN-uh]
Apollo's twin sister. Goddess of hunting and of wild things. She is associated with the moon. She is sometimes called "Cynthia."
stag, crescent, moon, cypress
Hades [HAY-deez]
Pluto [PLU-toe]
God of the underworld.
helmet, metal jewels
Ares [Air-eez]
Mars [MARZ]
Son of Zeus. Terrible god of war.
vulture, dog
Hephaestus [hee-FES-tuhs]
Vulcan [VUL-kan]
Son of Zeus and Hera, the lame blacksmith god of fire.
fire, blacksmith's hammer
Aphrodite [af-roh-DIE-tee}
Venus [VEE-nus]
The wife of Hephaestus, she is the goddess of love and beauty. She is said to have been born of the sea foam. Her son, Eros [AIR-ohss] (the Roman Cupid [KU-pid]), shoots arrows which cause men and women to fall in love. Another son, Aeneas [ee NEE-uhs], is a mortal man, considered to be the ancestor of the Romans.
dove, goose, sparrow, myrtle
Hermes [HER-meez]
Mercury [MER-cure-ee]
Son of Zeus. Messenger of the gods, he is also the god of science and invention
wand, winged sandals, winged helmet
Hestia [HES-tee-uh]
Vesta [VES-tuh]
Zeus's sister. Goddess of home and hearth.
hearth
Demeter [dee-MEE-ter]
Ceres [SEER-eez]
Zeus's sister. She is the very important goddess of grain and agriculture. She is a kind of bond between heaven and earth.
wheat

GREEK NAME
ROMAN NAME
CHARACTERISTICS
SYMBOL(S)
Zeus (ZOOS)
Jupiter (JOO-pit-er)
King of the gods. He is sometimes angry at the behavior of gods and people, but he can also be a gentle and caring ruler. he is particularly fond of beautiful women, regardless of whether they are goddesses or mortals.
thunderbolt, shield, oak tree
Poseidon (poh-SIE-don)
Neptune (NEP-toon)
Zeus's brother, God of the ocean and the earthquakes. He is often distinguished in art by the fisherman's trident that he carries-a three pronged spear.
trident, horse, bull
Hera (HEE-ruh)
Juno (Joo-noh)
Zeus's wife. Queen of the gods, guardian of marriage. She is a great lady and diplomat. Though she is often jealous and nags her husband, she can also be a tender and loving wife.
peacock, cow
Athena (uh-THEEN-uh)
Minerva (min-ER-vuh)
Daughter of Zeus (born, it is said, from his brain, when he had a bad headache). She is the goddess of wisdom and war, patriotism, and good citizenship. She is the protector and namesake of the city of Athens.
owl, shield, olive tree
Apollo [uh-PAW-loh]
Apollo
Son of Zeus. God of poetry, music, medicine and light. He is associated with the sun.
crow, dolphin, laurel, lyre
Artemis [AR-tim-is]
Diana [die-AN-uh]
Apollo's twin sister. Goddess of hunting and of wild things. She is associated with the moon. She is sometimes called "Cynthia."
stag, crescent, moon, cypress
Hades [HAY-deez]
Pluto [PLU-toe]
God of the underworld.
helmet, metal jewels
Ares [Air-eez]
Mars [MARZ]
Son of Zeus. Terrible god of war.
vulture, dog
Hephaestus [hee-FES-tuhs]
Vulcan [VUL-kan]
Son of Zeus and Hera, the lame blacksmith god of fire.
fire, blacksmith's hammer
Aphrodite [af-roh-DIE-tee}
Venus [VEE-nus]
The wife of Hephaestus, she is the goddess of love and beauty. She is said to have been born of the sea foam. Her son, Eros [AIR-ohss] (the Roman Cupid [KU-pid]), shoots arrows which cause men and women to fall in love. Another son, Aeneas [ee NEE-uhs], is a mortal man, considered to be the ancestor of the Romans.
dove, goose, sparrow, myrtle
Hermes [HER-meez]
Mercury [MER-cure-ee]
Son of Zeus. Messenger of the gods, he is also the god of science and invention
wand, winged sandals, winged helmet
Hestia [HES-tee-uh]
Vesta [VES-tuh]
Zeus's sister. Goddess of home and hearth.
hearth
Demeter [dee-MEE-ter]
Ceres [SEER-eez]
Zeus's sister. She is the very important goddess of grain and agriculture. She is a kind of bond between heaven and earth.
wheat
http://herosjourneyfoundation.org/: This website is great for deciphering between a male hero and female hero, it uses many ideas from Joesph Campbell. There are blogs and activities on various subjects about the journeys heroes take. -Katlyn Swanson


In light of our reading, here's a trailer for the movie "The Lightning Thief" -Kelsey Polhemus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_Mythology



Zimbio.com is a website where anyone can log-in and contribute an article they've written. They have different online "zines" for different genres. Here is the zine for greek mythology. It's interesting to read things written by people who might not be professional writers or scholars, and we can even contribute out own articles or reviews if we'd like to! --Gretchen Roesch
Rick Riordan's blog is a fantastic resource. He posts a lot of things about not only his own books but also about Greek, Egyptian, and Roman mythology. I found this post about Olympia especially interesting because he talks about Greek artifacts and their impact on today's time period (though sadly he talks about it because the artifacts were stolen). --Gretchen Roesch



Hey guys, I don't know how many of you are gamers but seeing as technology is constantly paying a huge role in society it got me thinking for a easier way to learn more about mythology. A few years ago I had been obsessed with a game called Age of Mythology. For anyone who has played the "Age of..." series then you can kind of get an idea of what this would be like. Basically you get to play the role of God, either Greek, Norse of Egyptian and control your land while trying to attain more land. It gave me a pretty good idea of what mythology was all about. Click thisto be directed to the wiki page dedicated to this game. At this point is a good 8 years old so if your interested it can't be more than a few bucks.
external image Age_of_Mythology_Liner.jpg
This is just the cover to the game but it actually got quite a bit of publicity upon its release so I recommend checking it out. There was a spin off, or expansion if that works better involving the Titans which was pretty awesome as well. I'm not claiming this to be 100% accurate but its not a bad way to learn a little bit more about your favorite god/goddess. -This post was brought to you by Luke Hider
Also I just found this to go along with my post. This is the trailer from 2002 when the game came out, I think it gives a pretty good description of what it is like.

Here's a page strictly dedicated to the Titans of Greek mythology. I had always wondered what their deal was and I figured I would share what I found.- Luke Hider


Here's a listing of Richard Adam's other works:
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/a/richard-adams/
If you click on the links, it will give you information about each work.
-Kelsey Polhemus


I know Wikipedia isn't a reliable source of information but I find that it can be useful to supplement your learning. I came across a Wiki page that discusses the mythological characters that Adams uses in each chapter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Watership_Down_characters
-Kelsey Polhemus


Here is a video of modern monomyths that will prove helpful in understanding the cycle.






-Amanda Guenther



THE HERO'S JOURNEYI understand visual representations much more clearly than reading examples, so here is a video of the hero's journey.







-Amanda Guenther


It was brought up on the discussion board the reliability of Adams as a nature writer so I wanted to find some resources that discussed rabbit behavior. Here is a good (and interesting) website I found:Rabbits!
-Kelsey Polhemus





The Symbolism of Rabbits and Hares

This site has a lot of useful information about the rabbit references that Adams makes in Watership Down...
-Kelsey Polhemus




This video discusses the main Egyptian myth characters present in the The Red Pyramid.
-Amanda Guenther



Similarities between Jesus, Mithras and Osiris.

-Amanda Guenther

Guide to Egyptian Gods and Godesses
The link above is a website that provides overviews of the Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. We have learned so much about Greek and Roman mythology, that sometimes we forget about the complex mythology that many other cultures have in their history! I wasn't aware of the complex stories and myths behind each god and goddess, and after reading "The Red Pyramid," I feel a bit more enlightened on the subject of Egyptian Mythology than I once had been.

The Famous Ones The most important Greek goddesses, heroines and victims, and nymphs in classical mythology
I found this site interesting because it not only explains the stories and characteristics of the Greek Goddesses, but it also puts a focus as well on the heroines, victims, and nymphs that also play a role in Green Mythology. I enjoyed this link because some less known goddesses are brought to light by this website.

I know a lot of people that believe only the canon should be taught in schools. They believe that young adult literature is not beneficial to students but I would have to disagree with them. Young adult literature is the key stepping stone to get students involved and interested in classic literature. Here are some websites I foudn that back up teaching mythology in the classroom...
Mythology Teacher
Sherry Salant
Susan Evans
-Kelsey Polhemus


Great site on Egyptian Mythology

This site is a gallery of mythology. It include symbols, legends, glossaries, Hieroglyphs, and a list of God and Goddesses.

-Amanda Guenther


While on a website, I saw an ad for this game. It is called Grepolis, and you basically go back to Greek times and "live." For anyone who has become interested in the Greek way of life, I thought you may be interested in this game. I haven't tried to play it, but I would like to know what people think.
Grepolis

--Cate Mahaney

While look up information on Norse mythology, I came across some interesting videos on YouTube. I will insert the first one, which discusses the creation of the world, but there is a whole series. You can find the link here, but this is: Norse Mythology: Creation of the Universe:


--Cate Mahaney



The Greek Myth of Hercules and music!


-Amanda Guenther

Mythology In Modern Business

The link above will take you to a whole list of businesses that have names derived from Mythology or, their advertising include some type of mythological symbol. One that I found interesting was Trident Gum, I had never even considered where that name came from. The website goes on to explain...."The three-pronged spear of Poseidon, god of the seas; Trident Gum is a popular gum. (Note: 'Tria' is Greek for 'three' and 'donti' means 'tooth'; hence, Trident translates literally as 'three-teeth', or 'triple-toothed'. Trident Gum, if one is to believe the advertising, helps to clean your teeth, thus the allusion)." Taking the time to have kids find very examples of modern day mythology usage and researching the myths could be a great project for the classroom! Mythology is all around us!


I found this great site that tells stories about real life heroes. Maybe at a pre-curser to a heroic story, have students tell/write stories of heroes they know in real life.
Link: Real Life Heroes
-Kelsey Polhemus


Life action role playing has become a large group on campus. This site is a forum for people that are real superheroes. It tells stories about people that do heroic things in everyday life.
-Kelsey Polhemus

This video is Rick Riordan (author of The Lightning Thief) as he talks about the importance of mythology in the classroom...


-Kelsey Polhemus